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Beaches To Visit

You’ll find lots of great Beaches to explore in the Isle Of Wight during your stay, at Warner Leisure Hotels. Alum Bay Beach Isle Of Wight makes a great day out.

Alum Bay Beach

Alum Bay Beach Isle Of Wight

Alum Bay beach is undoubtedly one of the most picturesque beaches on the Isle of Wight. This mainly shingle beach situated at the most westerly tip of the Island is framed by the iconic chalk stacks known as The Needles with the world famous coloured sands with 21 different shades creating a dramatic and natural shelter for the beach.

Bembridge Beach

Bembridge Beach

The main beach in Bembridge runs down the coast from the spit at the edge of Bembridge harbour. Consisting of stones, pebbles and shells but has sand below the high water mark and a large sandbank that extends into the Solent at low tide.

Brook Beach

Brook Beach

Brook Beach can be found on the unspoiled south west coast of the Isle of Wight. There is a National Trust Car Park serving Brook Beach, but there are no additional facilities. A stony road/slipway leads to the beach from the car park. The beach is made up of golden sands.

Colwell Bay

Colwell Bay

Colwell Bay is a sand and shingle beach on the western shore of the Isle of Wight. Colwell is also a popular beach for various watersports such as windsurfing and canoeing. For those looking for a more relaxing time beach huts and deck chairs are available for hire.

Compton Bay

Compton Bay

One of the Isle of Wight’s best kept secrets is Compton Beach. Compton offers a two mile stretch of contrasting golden and dark sands, with rolling seas, tumbling multi-coloured sandstone cliffs, and the white chalk cliffs at Freshwater in the distance.

Cowes Beach

Cowes Beach

Cowes Beach is a short pebble and shell covered beach. this beach is a great vantage point for the many sailing events that take place in the historic yachting town of Cowes throughout the year, including the world’s largest sailing regatta “Cowes Week”. Whilst the beach is mainly stoney, there is some sand underfoot below the low water mark and you can find shells, sea glass and other sea-jewels amongst the pebbles.

East Cowes Beach

East Cowes Beach

East Cowes is an easily accessible shingle beach, with a promenade and children’s play area, just a few minutes from the old Victorian town of East Cowes. Plenty of shops, pubs and restaurants.

Freshwater Bay

Freshwater Bay

Freshwater Bay beach is set in a dip between chalky cliffs. To the west these cliffs form the famous Needles Headland and Tennyson Downs. There is also a large car park and an esplanade.

Gurnard Beach

Gurnard Beach

Gurnard Beach is a quaint traditional, pebble and shingle beach, within walking distance of Cowes. It is bordered by attractive, municipally owned beach huts, mainly painted green, on its sea wall that are leased locally. Great views across the Solent, and some of the best sunsets you are likely to find.

Lake Beach

Lake Beach

Lake Beach is located between the popular resort beaches of Sandown and Shanklin. With golden sands and clear swimming waters also a number of benches to sit on along the sea wall path when the tide is further in.

Compton Bay

Ryde Beach

Ryde Beach offer miles and miles of sandy shores reaching so far out that Ryde pier had to be built to enable boats to dock and load/disembark passengers. A promenade stretches from the hovercraft terminal, next to Ryde railway station at the foot of the pier, eastwards passing the harbour. Then the pleasure beaches begin.

Sandown Beach

Sandown Beach

Sandown Beach is one of the Isle of Wight's finest and most recognised beaches. Sandown’s esplanade has traditional seaside cafes, souvenir and beach shops, whilst the pier has amusements galore, including a crazy golf course. The beach has several outlets to hire deckchairs, sun loungers and windbreaks.

Seagrove Beach

Seagrove Beach

Seagrove Bay on the north east coast and boasts some of the largest and most imposing seaside properties on the Isle of Wight. When the tide is out Seagrove Bay has a large expanse of golden sands.

Shanklin Beach

Shanklin Beach

The beach itself is safe and sandy, with clear water and plenty of parking nearby. Protection from the prevailing winds is provided by the headland of Dunnose Point.

Small Hope Beach

Small Hope Beach

Small Hope Beach sits to the left of the main Shanklin seafront and backs onto a spectacular cliff face. The cliff side of the sea wall is lined with beach huts which can be hired, some of which are set back from the pathway and have their own garden areas.

Springvale Beach

Springvale Beach

This beach is often undiscovered by visitors making it a great place to visit to avoid the crowds in the busy summer months. Parking at this end of the beach is chargeable during the day so make sure to buy a ticket.

Steephill Cove

Steephill Cove

This pretty little cove has no direct car access and remains an unspoilt idyll. A sandy beach backing onto an esplanade and collection of cottages.

Totland Bay

Totland Bay

The Beach has a short pier with a cafe opposite which are the public toilets and a row of pretty beach huts. A narrow road runs down to the seafront, which has some parking, but it is best to park at the top and walk down in the summer months as it as popular with the locals as it is visitors.

Ventnor Beach

Ventnor Beach

Nestled in the bay beneath the tumbling tiers of the Victorian town, Ventnor’s red shingle and golden sand beach has vintage beach huts that once had wheels and transported the gentry down to the sea to bath as they were bathing machines.

Yaverland Beach
Yaverland Beach

Yaverland Beach providing a long stretch of sand. Pathways through the undergrowth on the cliffs lead from the coastal path to the beach or vice versa. The orange sandstone cliffs gradually increase in height as they move towards the white chalk of Culver cliff and it is around here that fossil remains can be found.

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